Council meeting focuses on land development

With several developments proposed for the city of Killdeer, the Killdeer City Council voted Monday to ensure solid plans were in place to extend infrastructure to the necessary locations before developments begin construction.

Killdeer City Administrator Dawn Marquardt shows the Killdeer City Council members where the annexation boundaries are planned. (Photo by BRYCE MARTIN/Herald)
Killdeer City Administrator Dawn Marquardt shows the Killdeer City Council members where the annexation boundaries are planned. (Photo by BRYCE MARTIN/Herald)

 By BRYCE MARTIN

Herald Editor

Posted March 8, 2013 

KILLDEER — With several developments proposed for the city of Killdeer, the Killdeer City Council voted Monday to ensure solid plans were in place to extend infrastructure to the necessary locations before developments begin construction.

“I try to stay ahead of all the development that’s coming,” said Russ Sorensen, engineer for A2S, which handles the water and sewer planning for the city of Killdeer.

The council made a unanimous vote to allow Sorensen to proceed with the design for southern infrastructure. The preliminary engineering phase, which is approximately $235,000, is embedded in the total project cost of $450,000.

More impact grant funds will be sought to fund the project, which is estimated for completion in the fall, ahead of hotel’s construction.

“If the commission sets up that annexation boundary tonight, would that move it along sooner?” Killdeer City Administrator Dawn Marquardt asked Sorensen, who was conferencing with the council via telephone.

Despite approving moving forward on an annexation boundary at the meeting, that decision was said to have no bearing on the speed of the planning.

City plans sizeable land annex

Plans to annex – expand the city boundaries – of a sizeable amount of land led to lengthy discussion between the council members during the meeting.

With a majority of people within the proposed boundary lines approving the annex, the commission could move forward even if some object.

Boundaries will be at the corner of the 2 7/8 Bar, across Highway 22 to encompass the NDDOT building and the Dardis subdivision, proceeding the stretch to Hutchinson’s first subdivision. The total amount of land is currently under question, but will represent less than 100 acres of land to be annexed.

Marquardt advised the council to set the boundaries so they can then hold a hearing.

“I would set the boundaries to put them all in there and if those people object at the top of their lungs, move the boundary out of there … if they don’t want to hook up, they don’t have to hook up. Annex it all in and be done with it,” council member Monte Roshau said.

Council member Anita Mjolhus agreed with Roshau to annex all existing buildings and let people bring up their concerns during the hearing.

“They can protest at hearing if they desire,” Mjolhus said.

All area desired to be annexed in will be subtracted from the area of Dunn County’s tax revenue. Those property taxes are then in the city and not in the county.

The council voted unanimously to approve the agreement on the annexation boundaries.

Moving forward on the Nordsven property

The city potentially becoming landlords was something council members attempted to avoid when considering the acquisition of free property from Greg Nordsven.

Nordsven purchased four acres of land in northwestern Killdeer, outside of the city limits, planning now to give Killdeer that land, at no cost. The land was stipulated to solely be used for affordable housing purposes. Both Killdeer Public School and the city consider the location prime to house employees.

The main drawback, however, is the lack of infrastructure on the land, specifically no water or sewer. Cost for establishing an infrastructure would fall onto the city’s shoulders.

“(Nordsven) would like to see the city build on it or have a developer that would build on it for more affordable housing,” Marquardt said.

The council was suggesting $500 would be a reasonable monthly rent, with others citing 25 percent of income acceptable. The question now before the board was the funding for the city to extend its infrastructure out to the land.

“If we were to secure the property and have the school come onboard, it’ll probably be a lot easier to secure some type of funding or grant money with city entities owning it versus private developers to get some affordable housing for the school or city employees,” Mayor Dan Dolechek said.

While the city didn’t particularly like the idea of acting as landlord, Mjolhus said having more affordable housing is more important.

“I don’t think we’re in the business of making money off of whoever is occupying it,” Mjolhus said. “We’re just there to turn dollars and give them affordable place to live.”

The council made a unanimous vote to move forward to make an agreement with Nordsven on the property.

Contact Bryce Martin at bmartin@countrymedia.net.


Share this post

GAMES