Dribble From The Pen

To This End, Glorified

Job 11:11

II Thess. 1:11-12

“To this end also we pray for you always, that our God will count you worthy of your calling, and fulfill every desire for goodness and the work of faith with power, so that the name of our Lord Jesus will be glorified in you, and you in Him, according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ.”

By Reverend Ray

“Sanctification is a qualification indispensably necessary unto them who will be under the conduct of the Lord Christ unto salvation; he will lead none to heaven but whom he sanctifies on the earth. The holy God will not receive unholy persons; this living head will not admit of dead members, nor bring men into the possession of a glory which they neither love nor like.1”

“To this end also we pray for you always, that our God will count you worthy of your calling, and fulfill every desire for goodness and the work of faith with power, so that the name of our Lord Jesus will be glorified in you, and you in Him, according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ.”

“Sanctification is a qualification indispensably necessary unto them who will be under the conduct of the Lord Christ unto salvation; he will lead none to heaven but whom he sanctifies on the earth. The holy God will not receive unholy persons; this living head will not admit of dead members, nor bring men into the possession of a glory which they neither love nor like.1”

This week marks the remembrance of the greatest shift in thinking of the western world on the stage of history. Martin Luther has been credited with being the first modern man. Certainly, his contribution to the way the western culture interpreted its world and how it responded to social, domestic and intellectual issues cannot be ignored. Luther brought education, critical thinking, and dignity to the horizontal plain of life. He became the voice of women, children and the common laborer in a society that had excluded the dignity of man, granted him in the “imago Dei.”

He recovered the purpose of man as it is defined by the imago Dei by returning to the absolute authority of the Scripture. In the Holy Scriptures, Luther found the pervasive face of Almighty God staring intently, mercifully, graciously upon his contorted soul. Here, on the sacred fields of Holy Writ, he found the God, Who answered the question of the Psalter; “O Lord, who may abide in Your tent?

Who may dwell on Your holy hill?” (Ps. 15:1) or the query of a beleaguered Job; “If a man dies, will he live again? All the days of my struggle I will wait, Until my change comes.” (Job 14:14) From the Scripture, Luther, together with other men, who cast their very lives onto the stage of change for doctrinal clarity, forged the five tenants that came to define the substance and meaning of the Reformation.

The Word of God, was once again unleashed and unleashing the word freed the bell of the gospel of Jesus Christ to ring through the hollows, forests, hills and mountains of Western Europe. As the great English preacher, Charles H. Spurgeon described the nature of the Gospel; “Suppose a number of persons were to take it into their heads that they had to defend a lion, a full-grown king of beasts! There he is in the cage, and here come all the soldiers of the army to fight for him. Well, I should suggest to them, if they would not object, and feel that it was humbling to them, that they should kindly stand back, and open the door, and let the lion out! I believe that would be the best way of defending him, for he would take care of himself; and the best “apology” for the gospel is to let the gospel out.2” So, Luther and the Reformers kicked open the door, and left the gospel out.

But all of this cultural, religious and social upheaval would have remained meaningless if these men had merely pointed the church back to its beginnings or lobbied against social injustice and had not stated the end or objective of the divine principle. What was re-discovered was a meaning for life that transcends temporal existence. The Apostle Paul had defined life’s meaning some 1500 years before; “to this end… so that the name of our Lord Jesus Christ will be glorified in you and you in Him.” The Reformers ripped the meaningless mundane existence out of the pages of human history; directing man into a context of definition that was beyond himself; man, as God defines him. As the Westminster Shorter Catechism succinctly states; “Man’s chief end is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever.” All other ends are vacuous.

Dribble from the pen

1 Ritzema, E., & Vince, E. (Eds.). (2013). 300 Quotations for Preachers from the Puritans. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press.

2 Spurgeon, C. H. (1896). Christ and His Co-Workers. In The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit Sermons (Vol. 42, p. 256). London: Passmore & Alabaster.

The Rev. Ray Druckenmiller is the Pastor at Manning Community Church.


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