New Halliday lunch program to help students, parents

Halliday is trying out a summer program and it’s set to benefit both parents and children.

PHOTO BY MAGGIE PIATZ / DC HERALD Brian Larson and Gayle Limbeck work daily to ensure the free meals served to the children are well-balanced and nutritious.
PHOTO BY MAGGIE PIATZ / DC HERALD
Brian Larson and Gayle Limbeck work daily to ensure the free meals served to the children are well-balanced and nutritious.
PHOTO BY MAGGIE PIATZ / DC HERALD Halliday School Superintendent Bill Colter announces a new summer lunch program to help benefit students and their parents.
PHOTO BY MAGGIE PIATZ / DC HERALD
Halliday School Superintendent Bill Colter announces a new summer lunch program to help benefit students and their parents.

 

By MAGGIE PIATZ | Staff Reporter

Halliday is trying out a summer program and it’s set to benefit both parents and children.

The new program, funded by the state of North Dakota, allows children – 18 years old and under – to go to the Halliday School each day at 11:30 a.m. for free, nutritious meals. While it doesn’t matter where they go to school, the children need to live within the town of Halliday.

The meals are served between T-Ball, in the morning, and other ball games, held in the afternoon.

It was reported that the school averages 20 meals a day, but have had as many as 30 children for lunch. For each lunch served, the school receives a reimbursement by the state.

Officials with the state contacted Bill Colter, principal and superintendent of the Halliday School, because “they are aware that these small communities in our area are growing with many young families.”

“Their question was, do we have families who qualify? Many of these families have both parents working during the day and they wanted to help provide good lunches for these families,” Colter said.

Along with the state funding, oil companies, businesses and other entities have helped to provide funding for the food served.

Cory Tuhy, of Whiting Oil and Gas Corporation, Tom Picken from Dunn County Social Services and Wayne Hoffner of Union Bank helped the program succeed.

Added to the financial support, the school also has received paper plates and other utensils for serving the meals.

Brian Larson comes in each morning, along with volunteer Gayle Limbeck, to prepare and serve the lunches.

The monthly menus are set by state standards and include a hot meal served on Monday, Wednesday and Fridays; on Tuesday and Thursday, they serve soups and sandwiches.

All food is served with well-balanced nutrition in mind.

Larson said he sees to it that they serve fruits, raw vegetables, grain and protein in each meal.

“We are here to provide a good nutritious meal for the kids,” Larson said. He said he also feels that the social interaction with the children is just as important as the food they receive.


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