West Dunn Fire Department gets new rig

The West Dunn Fire Department welcomed a new addition to its garage April 29 – a large, bright red fire truck that is “built for a quick attack.”

The West Dunn Fire Department welcomed a new $350,000 rig April 29. It utilizes several state-of-the-art features to assist in battling vehicular and structural fires. (Photo by BRYCE MARTIN/Herald)

The West Dunn Fire Department welcomed a new $350,000 rig April 29. It utilizes several state-of-the-art features to assist in battling vehicular and structural fires. (Photo by BRYCE MARTIN/Herald)
The West Dunn Fire Department welcomed a new $350,000 rig April 29. It utilizes several state-of-the-art features to assist in battling vehicular and structural fires. (Photo by BRYCE MARTIN/Herald)
The West Dunn Fire Department welcomed a new $350,000 rig April 29. It utilizes several state-of-the-art features to assist in battling vehicular and structural fires. (Photo by BRYCE MARTIN/Herald)

By BRYCE MARTIN

Herald Editor

Posted May 10, 2013

The West Dunn Fire Department welcomed a new addition to its garage April 29 – a large, bright red fire truck that is “built for a quick attack.”

West Dunn Fire Chief Chuck Muscha said the new fire-battling vehicle cost roughly $350,000, funded by an energy impact grant and Dunn County.

“I’d like to thank them both because, without either one, that truck wouldn’t be there,” Muscha said.

Named rig 801, the new unit goes to replace the previous truck that was quickly becoming obsolete. Muscha said he wanted it replaced before it failed in the field. That particular rig was older, coming in during the last boom in Dunn County when it served as “the workhorse of the department.”

The West Dunn Fire Department, which serves all of Dunn County, has 10 trucks – three tankers and pumpers, three units primarily for grass fires, a rescue rig and three trucks in Dunn Center.

What makes the new truck special, however, is its state-of-the-art capabilities to assist in battling mainly vehicular and structural fires.

The truck has a four-door cab with air packs built in on four of the seats.

“It can roll up to a car, pickup or semi on fire, have your air packs on and step out,” he said.

The truck pumps high pressure and volume utilizing a two-stage pump, which can run simultaneously.

“You can pull up there, open the hose reels for the high pressure and step out … and within whatever it takes the operator to put the pump in gear and pull two valves, you’ll have water – within minutes,” he said.

It also has two 20-gallon foam cells, with two different class foams onboard.

“You can pull up to a car fire and put foam on it right away or for a wood structure, use Class A foam and knock it down right away,” he said. “Plus, it’s got the potential to hook to the hydrant, to run the big hoses.”

Muscha said 30 years from now, the truck still would be up to usability standards.

The truck was manufactured on an International chassis with a Rosenbauer pump and built by Heiman, based in Iowa. Muscha said he spent two years designing the truck.

“It’s kind of like the rescue rig,” he said. “When you leave that hall with four or five guys, that truck can do everything you need to do to get somebody out. You don’t have to wait for two, three trucks to roll out.

“The truck’s going to be a great asset to this department.”

Contact Bryce Martin at bmartin@countrymedia.net.


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